70-573-Csharp 70-461 0B0-101 70-528 C4070-SS1 C90-06A 000-569 642-342 1Z0-807 EE0-600 77-882 1Z0-630 1Z0-554 HP0-500 070-689 A2040-923 000-SS1 70-523-Csharp 1Y0-310 000-619 642-145 RDCR08301 3X0-104 1Z0-860 C2170-051 MB3-530 9A0-034 FCGIT 920-165 250-924 642-566 CA1-001 642-444 70-238 310-110 000-422 70-467 310-610BIG5 50-695 70-599 650-026 77-601 E20-825 QQ0-200 510-022 000-257 C2040-442 COG-200 000-M196 9A0-095 3X0-101 1Z0-055 650-177 HC-832-CHS 9A0-079 70-502-Csharp HP0-M47 ICDL-NET 1Z1-213 000-379 HP0-345 220-302 000-736 000-169 HP0-P13 HP0-S36 000-748 644-337 310-878 E20-405 090-055 70-685J 50-692 Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague
Children have been always inseparable from artefacts for play, be it objects purpose made as toys or found in nature. For centuries toys were to some extent copies of the adult world as a way of introducing children into their forthcoming roles: girls as mothers and housewives, boys as hunters and fighters. The best example of this is a doll, a miniature human being. Dolls were dressed as their little owners, who in turn dressed as their mothers, and in this way dolls serve as evidence of fashion. A baby doll is not documented until the first half of the 19th century. The end of the 19th century is regarded as the golden era of toys, mechanisation of production brought a greater variety and financial accessibility for all classes of society. The beginning of the 20th century saw a return to handmade toys, as a way of inculcating good taste and developing feeling for nature and art. This endeavour lasted throughout the whole century.

Walrus
Ladislav Sutnar, ca 1930