High-quality examination questions

70-494 1Z0-434 CAS-002 500-260 700-039 74-678 1Z0-599 010-151 400-201 70-341 70-385 300-080 70-483 1Z0-808 M270-740 210-060 CBAP 101 exam 70-534 642-996 exam 70-981 102-400 70-697 350-018 1Z0-821 400-051 70-243 CISA 300-085 200-105 300-208 70-411 70-480 NS0-157 CCA-500 648-244 Exam MB5-705 300-209 70-465 400-101 Exam 642-980 Exam 300-206 Exam NSE7 CQA 200-601 700-037 642-887 300-320 210-451 EX300 70-469 300-70 70-346 OG0-093 100-105 EX200 600-199 1K0-001 200-310 210-065 70-486 101-01 642-732 RCDD IIA-CGAP LX0-104 M70-201 400-351 MB6-703 NSE4 DEV-401 Exam VCS-273 HP0-S41 GCIH 70-466 Exam

Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague
1885
Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague founded by the Prague Chamber of Trade and Commerce

1885—1900
Museum housed in Rudolfinum

1897—1899
new building designed by architect Josef Schulz is under construction

1900
grand opening of the new museum building, exhibitions on the first floor

1906
Vojtěch Lanna donates his collection of glass, exhibitions on the second floor

1932
Gustav Pazaurek bequeathed his collection of glass, and together with Lanna’s this becomes the core of the now world-renowned Museum’s glass collection

1943
the Museum building is taken over for war purposes, collections are moved and hidden outside Prague

1949
the Museum is nationalised

1950
the Museum is merged temporarily with the Museum of Decorative Arts in Brno, permanent exhibitions are being prepared in the recently nationalised castles outside Prague (Castle Lemberk 1951, Klášterec n. Ohří 1952, Jemniště u Benešova 1953)

1959—1969
the Museum is merged with the National Gallery in Prague

1970
the Museum is re-established as a sovereign institution governed by the Ministry of Culture

1970—1985
Museum is closed to the public and undergoes a major rebuilding programme

1985
new permanent exhibitions of decorative arts from Renaissance to mid 19th century open

2000—2001
new permanent display Stories of Materials
The first trade and commerce chambers were established in the 17th and 18th centuries in France, with the aim to create independent organisations which would protect and promote the interests of trade and commerce. During the Napoleonic Wars they established themselves in Germany and, in 1811, in the Austrian provinces in Italy. They were instituted by law throughout Austria in 1850, and in the Czech lands they were established in Prague, Liberec, Cheb, Plzeň, České Budějovice, Brno, Olomouc, and Opava. Their task was to provide reports, proposals and expert opinion for state and regional authorities on the needs of trade and commerce, and the state of transport, as well as to participate in the preparation of laws and the establishment of public institutions for the advancement of trade and commerce. Representatives of chambers were elected, and the chambers themselves then delegated a certain number of members for the regional assembly and Austrian parliament.