70-573-Csharp 70-461 0B0-101 70-528 C4070-SS1 C90-06A 000-569 642-342 1Z0-807 EE0-600 77-882 1Z0-630 1Z0-554 HP0-500 070-689 A2040-923 000-SS1 70-523-Csharp 1Y0-310 000-619 642-145 RDCR08301 3X0-104 1Z0-860 C2170-051 MB3-530 9A0-034 FCGIT 920-165 250-924 642-566 CA1-001 642-444 70-238 310-110 000-422 70-467 310-610BIG5 50-695 70-599 650-026 77-601 E20-825 QQ0-200 510-022 000-257 C2040-442 COG-200 000-M196 9A0-095 3X0-101 1Z0-055 650-177 HC-832-CHS 9A0-079 70-502-Csharp HP0-M47 ICDL-NET 1Z1-213 000-379 HP0-345 220-302 000-736 000-169 HP0-P13 HP0-S36 000-748 644-337 310-878 E20-405 090-055 70-685J 50-692 Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague
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Eugen Wiškovský) Fototorst edition The oeuvre of the Czech avant-garde photographer Eugen Wiškovský (1888-1964) is not great in terms of number or thematic scope, but in its originality, conceptual depth and formal mastery. In his early works made in the style of New Objectivity, Wiškovský sought visually compelling forms in objects seemingly lacking aesthetic qualities, which he manipulated by cut-outs, a change of scale or inventive work with light. In his dynamic, diagonal compositions using unusual angles of shots, he was one of the most radical exponents of Czech Constructivist photography. His landscape photography also boasts great originality. Of equal importance are Wiškovský’s treatises on photography theory, in which he applied aspects from the psychology of forms. A number of the photographs reproduced in the book come from UPM’s collection.
Shapes and Spaces: The Collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague) For the first time in its history, in the year of its 120th anniversary, the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague had the opportunity to introduce masterpieces from its collections in Portugal. With an introductory essay by Professor José de Monterroso Teixeira and texts by Daniela Karasová and other UPM curators, the book was published to accompany an exhibition hosted by the Museum of Portuguese Decorative Arts in Lisbon. It features unique objects made of glass, ceramics and porcelain, as well as furniture, jewellery, metals, textiles, clothing and graphic art dating from the Renaissance to the Art Nouveau periods, with a focus on Central Europe. The selection attests to the diversity and wealth of the Prague museum’s collections and documents how decorative art contributed to shaping Central Europe's cultural identity. The publication was issued by the Fundação Ricardo do Espírito Santo Silva, Lisboa in the cooperation with the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague to accompany the exhibition in the Fundação Ricardo do Espírito Santo Silva, Lisboa, Autumn 2005.
Schloss Klösterle an der Eger: Führer durch die Porzellanaustellung aus der Sammlung des Kunstgewerb) Klášterec n. Ohří Chateau – guide to the permanent exhibition of porcelain from the collections of the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague. It presents to the readers development of porcelain in the Bohemian Lands, including examples of Chinese and Japanese porcelain.
Never before Seen in Prague) Published to accompany an exhibition of posters advertising Prague entertainment venues, the book traces the years 1900–1930, as Prague gradually changed from a provincial town into a modern, self-confident city and eventually into the capital of an independent state. Poster art is a unique testimonial to this transformation: at the turn of the century, lithographic posters became an integral part of Prague’s streets and alleyways, later than in such metropolises as Paris, London and New York, yet virtually at the same time as the monarchy’s capital Vienna. With some exceptions, the Depression put an end to the era of the pictorial poster in 1930. The posters present diverse forms of entertainment in Prague: night clubs, social functions, balls, soirées organized by various voluntary associations, circus shows and magician performances, and – last but not least – the film industry. The publication was issued by the Municipal House in Prague in cooperation with the Museum of Decorative Arts to accompany the exhibition held in the Municipal House, September 2005 – January 2006.
Clocks and Watches in the Collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague) The collection of clocks and watches shows changes in time-keeping in particular from the point of view of artistic treatment of clock cases, while documenting the development of the clock mechanism. The horology collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague is one of the largest and most varied in the Czech Republic in terms of kind as well as artistic design. Whereas the National Technical Museum specializes in the mechanical aspect of clocks, the Museum of Decorative Arts focuses on artistically shaped and decorated items.
Czech Photography of the 20th Century – Guide) It is a comprehensive presentation of the main trends, personalities, and works of Czech photography from 1901 to 2000. Not wanting to show merely works by the most important photographers such as F. Drtikol, J. Sudek, J. Rössler, J. Funke, J. Štyrský, J. Koudelka, J. Svoboda, J. Saudek, J. Štreit, and A. Kratochvíl, the authors have sought to document various creative trends also with photographs by lesser known and sometimes even totally forgotten photographers.
Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague – Guide) A Guide to the permanent exhibition of the Museum of Decorative Arts called "The Stories of Materials" beginning with The Story of Fibre: the textiles and fashion hall, and continues with Time Machines: the clocks and watches hall, The Fire Arts: the glass and ceramics hall, Print and Picture: the hall of graphic design and photography, and The Treasury: the hall of metals and various other materials. There is also information about branches of the Museum, its permanent exhibitions in Prague and elsewhere, and exhibitions in chateaux.